Search

Subscribe

Enter your email to subscribe to future updates

Posts Tagged ‘Martel’

In the North of France’s Lot department, history and geography combine to mark the transition from the Massif Central to Causse. Here were the landholdings of the Duchy of Aquitaine and the possessions of the Counts of Toulouse.

The diversity in topography provides visible proof: the Correze’s shale foothills of the Massif Central, offers undulating, broken features both wooded and green; the Lot’s wide limestone plateau is accented by dry-stone walls that are centuries old and valleys where sometimes water disappears into a secret subterranean networks.

The evidence of man’s pre-history and evolution through medieval times is everywhere. Neanderthal’s and Cro-Magnon’s co-existed for a time here. These are the lands of Eleanor of Aquitaine, King Henry, Richard the Lionhearted and birthplace to the crusading Knights Templar’s.

Three great families fought for centuries over this territory. The Turenne’s from their Chateau near Brive, controlled Saint Céré, Martel, Collonges and Curemonte. The Cardaillac’s controlled an area from Saint-Cirq-Lapopie to Lacapelle-Marival. The Castelnaus formed the armed guard of their sovereign, the Count of Toulouse, before becoming vassals of the Viscount of Turenne in 1183.

This region rich in castles has its religious roots founded in the middle ages. One of Europe’s principal pilgrim routes to Santiago de Compostela runs though the very heart of Rocamadour and many of our other beautiful villages:

So why not come for a visit with us? We’ll be happy happy to help you navigate the Dordogne River Valley and surrounds!

Plan to visit in 2013? Please check out the delightful accommodations at: Le Sud. Or email us about affordable homestays at our rural and eclectic French home: Rancho Escargot.

Both are located in the very heart of the Dordogne River Valley!

Bonne Route et à bientôt! Jack
‘LIKE’ our FB page for more frequent postings

April 28, 2013 - Posted by Jack Tobin

Périgord is considered one of the “cradles of the walnut” – they have been found among the remains of Cro-Magnon dwellings here dating back 17,000 years. They helped make the area prosperous in the Middle Ages and are still emblematic of Périgord today.

 

In the Middle Ages, walnuts were so prized that locals paid debts in them and the Cistercian abbey of Dalon had tenants pay rent in walnut oil. The oil was used for cooking, as well as for lighting lamps from homes to cathedrals, and people would rub it on their skin instead of soap.

From the 17th century, there was a flourishing export trade, including to Britain, via Bordeaux. Today, the Périgord production area covers the Lot, Corrèze and Dordogne and a small part of the Charente. Visitors can explore the Route de la Noix (Walnut Route), which takes in the key towns of Martel (Lot), Domme (Dordogne), Hautefort (Dordogne) and Collonges la Rouge (Corrèze).

Click Map for complete look at: ‘Route de la Noix’

Whether you decide to bike, walk or drive there are many unique adventures and culinary delights to be discovered on the ‘Route de la Noix’!

Exploring the walnut routes is as enjoyable as sampling all the local products produced! Plan to visit in 2013? Please check out the delightful accommodations at Le Sud which is located in the very heart of the region!

Bon Voyage et à bientôt! Jack
‘LIKE’ our FB page for more frequent postings

February 17, 2013 - Posted by Jack Tobin

I wonder what stories have played out both in-front and behind these doors … KayakDordogne.com will look deeper into the pre-historic & medieval past around the Dordogne River Valley. We will also continue to post about present day: culture, cuisine, arts and recreation.

A metaphor for life, doors.
From our earliest years we
open and shut them without
a thought, yet they symbolize
our journey to the very end.

 

In many ways, things are very slow to change around the LOT and its neighboring departments. Is this a detriment or benefit to the areas future? I am uncertain. I do know the door to this destination’s tourism potential has never been fully opened and could be the savior to its weak local economy.

We plan on keeping this portal of discovery open and hope you will soon have the opportunity to: paddle, bike, trek, and savor its many rich wonders personally.

When you do arrive don’t hesitate knocking on our door!

à bientôt! Jack

Please click ‘LIKE’ on our FB page for more frequent postings

August 19, 2012 - Posted by Jack Tobin